IgG Antibody Testing

IgG Antibody Testing Now Available!

At Aria Diagnostics, we care about the health and safety of our community. We are now offering testing for SARS-COV2-IgG. This serology test (antibody test) is a critical next step in battling this virus. This test helps to detect the IgG antibody to SARS-CoV-2. An antibody is a protein that the body produces in the late stages of infection and can remain for months and even years after a person has recovered. Detecting these antibodies will help determine if a person was previously infected with the virus that causes COVID-19.

About IgG Antibody Tests

The SARS-COV2- IMMUNOASSAYS (IgG) can provide a broader picture of the SARS-CoV-2 virus such that if someone has been previously infected with the virus it can show up in the body long after the initial infection. This test is designed by trusted and leading Abbot scientists and manufactured in volumes required to support the urgent needs of ongoing patient care

While molecular testing (swab testing) can identify people currently infected with the virus, only the antibody test can tell whether someone has been previously infected. This type of information will help scientists better understand how long these antibodies stay in the body and if they provide immunity. This information also helps public health officials understand how widespread the outbreak is and could help support development of treatments and/or vaccines for COVID-19.

The IgG Antibody test that Aria Diagnostics uses is the only FDA approved test for detecting the SARS-COV2-IgG Antibody at this point in time. It is important to note that a similar test called the IgM antibody test is unreliable and has not been approved by the FDA, the China’s Center for Medical Device Evaluation, or the NMPA, which is China’s equivalent of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. These tests, supplied by Chinese manufacturers, are unreliable and can produce false results (either negative or positive).

Returning To Work Safely

The CDC recently released a Return to Work Criteria for HCPs with confirmed COVID-19, or suspected COVID-19. Decisions to return to work for HCP with confirmed OR suspected COVID-19 should be made in the context of local circumstances. Options include a symptom-based, or time-based strategy and most recently, a test-based strategy.

 

Return to Work Criteria for HCP with Suspected or Confirmed COVID-19

Symptomatic HCP with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 (Either strategy is acceptable depending on local circumstances):

  • Symptom-based strategy. Exclude from work until:

    • ​At least 3 days (72 hours) have passed since recovery defined as resolution of fever without the use of fever-reducing medications and improvement in respiratory symptoms (e.g., cough, shortness of breath); and,

    • At least 10 days have passed since symptoms first appeared

  • Test-based strategy. Exclude from work until:

    • ​Resolution of fever without the use of fever-reducing medications and

    • Improvement in respiratory symptoms (e.g., cough, shortness of breath), and

    • Negative results of an FDA Emergency Use Authorized COVID-19 molecular assay for detection of SARS-CoV-2 RNA from at least two consecutive respiratory specimens collected ≥24 hours apart (total of two negative specimens)[1]. See Interim Guidelines for Collecting, Handling, and Testing Clinical Specimens for 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV). Of note, there have been reports of prolonged detection of RNA without direct correlation to viral culture.

 

HCP with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 who have not had any symptoms (Either strategy is acceptable depending on local circumstances):

  • Time-based strategy. Exclude from work until:

    • ​10 days have passed since the date of their first positive COVID-19 diagnostic test assuming they have not subsequently developed symptoms since their positive test. If they develop symptoms, then the symptom-based or test-based strategy should be used.  Note, because symptoms cannot be used to gauge where these individuals are in the course of their illness, it is possible that the duration of viral shedding could be longer or shorter than 10 days after their first positive test.

  • Test-based strategy. Exclude from work until:

    • ​Negative results of an FDA Emergency Use Authorized COVID-19 molecular assay for detection of SARS-CoV-2 RNA from at least two consecutive respiratory specimens collected ≥24 hours apart (total of two negative specimens). Note, because of the absence of symptoms, it is not possible to gauge where these individuals are in the course of their illness.  There have been reports of prolonged detection of RNA without direct correlation to viral culture.

Note that detecting viral RNA via PCR does not necessarily mean that infectious virus is present.

Consider consulting with local infectious disease experts when making return to work decisions for individuals who might remain infectious longer than 10 days (e.g., severely immunocompromised).

If HCP had COVID-19 ruled out and have an alternate diagnosis (e.g., tested positive for influenza), criteria for return to work should be based on that diagnosis.

Return to Work Practices and Work Restrictions

After returning to work, HCP should:

  • Wear a facemask for source control at all times while in the healthcare facility until all symptoms are completely resolved or at baseline. A facemask instead of a cloth face covering should be used by these HCP for source control during this time period while in the facility. After this time period, these HCP should revert to their facility policy regarding universal source control during the pandemic.

    • ​A facemask for source control does not replace the need to wear an N95 or higher-level respirator (or other recommended PPE) when indicated, including when caring for patients with suspected or confirmed COVID-19.

    • Of note, N95 or other respirators with an exhaust valve might not provide source control.

  • Self-monitor for symptoms, and seek re-evaluation from occupational health if respiratory symptoms recur or worsen

Strategies to Mitigate Healthcare Personnel Staffing Shortages

Maintaining appropriate staffing in healthcare facilities is essential to providing a safe work environment for HCP and safe patient care. As the COVID-19 pandemic progresses, staffing shortages will likely occur due to HCP exposures, illness, or need to care for family members at home. Healthcare facilities must be prepared for potential staffing shortages and have plans and processes in place to mitigate them, including considerations for permitting HCP to return to work without meeting all return to work criteria above. Refer to the Strategies to Mitigate Healthcare Personnel Staffing Shortages document for information. As part of this, asymptomatic HCP with a recognized COVID-19 exposure might be permitted to work in a crisis capacity strategy to address staffing shortages if they wear a facemask for source control for 14 days after the exposure. This time period is based on the current incubation period for COVID-19 which is 14 days.

How To Get Tested

Aria Diagnostics is now providing IgG Antibody testing. A sample of your blood is taken and loaded into a special instrument that detects whether IgG antibodies are present in the blood sample. This instrument can provide up to 6,000 tests per day. The Results are provided to the designated individual(s) within 48-72 hours.

Click Here to Schedule Your Test

 
 
 

317-733-9454

5635 W. 96th St, Suite 300, Indianapolis, IN 46278

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